Health Matters Blog

Osteopaths Filling the Gap in Primary Care

Published October 11, 2011

Prudence MacKinney by Prudence MacKinney, VP Physician & Business Development [caption id="attachment_2228" align="alignright" width="160" caption="Prudence MacKinney"][/caption] The primary care landscape has undergone a significant change over the past two decades, with more and more physicians entering the field with a Doctor of Osteopathy (D.O.) degree than the more traditionally recognized M.D. designation. This rise is spurred by the growing awareness of the connection between a patient's mind, body and spirit and the belief that each depends on the other for good overall health. More than 60,000 physicians currently practicing medicine in th...

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BMH Says in Treating a Heart Attack – Time Matters

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by Christopher Schmidt, MD, and  John Starkey, RN. When President Dwight Eisenhower had a heart attack in 1955, doctors had limited tools for dealing with it. Eisenhower survived with treatment that consisted mainly of morphine to kill the pain and bed rest that continued for nearly a month before he was able to sit in a chair for a few hours each day. Thirty years ago, if you were having a heart attack you were put on pain medication and sent to the ICU to treat the pain and monitor the heart. In the mid-1980s, clot-dissolving medicines officially called thrombolytics (but commonly known as ‘clot busters’), starting with Strept...

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The Importance of Foot Health

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David S. Liebow, DPM by Dr. David Liebow, DMP [caption id="attachment_520" align="alignright" width="200" caption="David S. Liebow, DPM"][/caption] When everything is fine, it is often easy not to even think about our feet. But if a foot condition develops that causes pain and deformity, it is hard to be able to think of anything else. Our feet are our vehicle; they take us where we need to go; they carry all our weight. So when something goes wrong with them, it can disrupt how we live our day-to-day lives. There are many things we can do to prevent a variety of maladies to our feet. Wearing shoes with good support and adequate toe room is one of the ma...

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What is Angina?

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By Jeff Harr, RCEP, Coordinator of BMH Cardiac Rehab and Burton Tepfer, MD Angina is defined as acute pain in the chest resulting from decreased blood supply to the heart muscle. This is most often the result of a blockage to one or more of the coronary arteries that supply the heart muscle with blood, nutrients, and oxygen. Risk factors for the development of these blockages are: increased cholesterol levels, high blood pressure, diabetes, being overweight or obese, inactivity, tobacco use, chronic stress, positive family history, and increasing age. Symptoms include chest pain, pressure, tightness, and heaviness. The symptoms may radi...

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Top Questions About Colon Cancer Screenings & Colonoscopy

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Jeffry Potash, MD [caption id="attachment_538" align="alignright" width="200" caption="Jeffry Potash, MD"][/caption] by Jeffry Potash, MD Why is there so much talk about colon cancer? Colon cancer is the third most common cancer. In Vermont, there are about 330 new cases per year and 24 of them are from Windham County. Many people know someone affected by this disease. Can colon cancer be prevented? Yes, to a certain degree. All major health authorities recommend colon cancer screening for people beginning at age 50. Screening is testing people for the disease, even if they have no symptoms. Individuals should not wait for a symptom, such as r...

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Don’t Let a Hernia Put a Strain on Your Life

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Thomas H. Lewis, MD by Thomas H. Lewis, M.D. [caption id="attachment_518" align="alignright" width="200" caption="Thomas H. Lewis, MD"][/caption] Hernias happen. They happen to overweight, out-of-shape smokers, and they happen to highly trained athletes. They happen to persons who strain too much while lifting, and they happen to those who merely sit in a chair. While they are more common in men, they also occur frequently in pregnant women. A hernia happens when a small portion of tissue from inside pushes through a weak spot in the abdominal wall. In about 75 percent of cases, this occurs in the inguinal canal, the area where the abdomen meets the thi...

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Why Get Mammograms?

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Joseph Rosen, MD by Joseph Rosen, MD [caption id="attachment_543" align="alignright" width="200" caption="Joseph Rosen, MD"][/caption]

The American Cancer Society, (ACS, 2009), estimates that 15% of all U.S. cancer deaths this year, in women, will be from breast cancer. This is after a decade long decline in the risk of a women dying after a breast cancer diagnosis. Approximately 2/3 of this better survival number is attributed to the earlier diagnosis made possible from yearly mammographic screening. A mammogram is used to detect breast cancer before it gets to a size that you can feel. When a breast cancer is found early there are bet...

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Breastfeeding Week Celebrated (August 1 – 7)

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by Dawn M. Kersula [caption id="attachment_2208" align="alignright" width="300" caption="Dawn Kersula"][/caption] Sometimes the best thing for a baby is a snuggle. We carry our babies “under our hearts” for nine months, and the moment of birth is magic. But what must the baby think? Gone is the warm, wet, safe hugs of the womb, and here is a new place filled with light, loud noises, cold. How can we welcome that baby to our world? Birthing Center nurses Aimee Creelman MSN, IBCLC and Gloria Baldwin RN, IBCLC (both certified lactation consultants) recently worked on a project at the BMH Birthing Center that helped answer that qu...

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Diabetes and the EYE

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Dana F. McGinn, MD by Dana McGinn, MD [caption id="attachment_524" align="alignright" width="200" caption="Dana McGinn, MD"][/caption] Diabetes mellitus is an abnormality in the body’s ability to use and store sugar properly. High blood sugar levels can have a profound affect on blood vessels throughout the vascular system. Some of the earliest functional problems are manifested in the retina, the nerve layer in the eye that receives light and sends images to the visual cortex in the brain. This vessel damage is referred to as diabetic retinopathy. The two types of retinopathy are: non-proliferative (NPDR) and proliferative (vessel growing) (PDR.) ...

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Eating Right Is Important for Your Health

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by Carrie Quimby, RD, CD, MOEd [caption id="attachment_2202" align="alignright" width="223" caption="Carrie Quimby, RD, CS, MOEd"][/caption] In March, the American Dietetic Association encourages good nutrition by sponsoring National Nutrition Month. The theme for the month-long celebration is “Eat Right”. The group, which is promoting eating right for a healthy weight, has issued advice on achieving and maintaining a healthier weight to contribute to one’s overall health and well being. You know how many different and ever-changing health claims we all hear, you know about all the diet advice available in the media, and it’s ha...

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